What makes an outstanding senior leader? #360Review (Part 1 of 6)

@TeacherToolkitIn 2010, Ross Morrison McGill founded @TeacherToolkit from a simple Twitter account through which he rapidly became the ‘most followed teacher on social media in the UK’. In 2015, he was nominated as one of the ‘500 Most Influential People in Britain’ by The Sunday… Read more about @TeacherToolkitIn my final educational composition for 2013, I am offering a reflection on my own school leadership. What makes an outstanding senior leader? Here, I pose a series of questions for the reader and expose my very own #360Review. This is part one of a six-part leadership series to be posted over the holiday period.You are reading part 1 of 6 articles on ‘What makes an outstanding senior leader?’ #360ReviewContext:After being inspired by headteacher, @JohnTomsett and his public self-review of lesson observations: This much I know about…being coached to improve my body language!; I hope that by sharing my own 360 self-review (#360Review) of the NPQH Leadership Standards, I will gain feedback from a myriad of sources. The intention, that a) I develop and b) that I share the expectations of headship in complex detail.Recently, I have been challenged by appraisal discussions with my current headteacher: The Ugly Truth. These discussions, as you would expect, are supportive; challenging and provocative; and have probed deep into my own consciousness and educational values. Something, I must re-visit.However, on the flipped side; blogging; tweeting and publishing my first book has opened up so many other doors, that I have recently started to question, whether or not I do want to become a headteacher. The vision to lead my own school, is still very much real for me. But with #Find_TTkit_A_Job on the horizon and future events and publications, I have to constantly re-evaluate my priorities and balance What, When, Why, How and What if? …If you looked through the lens, what do you see?What do you see?Photo Credit: highdynamic87 via Compfight ccFirstly, I do not claim to have all the answers, nor claim to live up to this blogpost title day-in, day-out! This would be highly unrealistic and an over-zealous statement to make. But, what I can tell you is; is that I do know what it’s like to work for a great senior leadership team, as well as working for (with) a diabolical leadership team!References:In the series, I will make references to ND Strupler, who I discovered online some years ago, who has written countless blogs on leadership in general. However, most, if not all, can be applied to the field of education and is where I take some of my leadership ‘alternatives’ from. Of course, throughout the past 10 years, I have sourced my own leadership skills and values and apply them daily. I hope that by sharing my #360Review, it will become apparent to some, what kind of outstanding senior leader I may become?Change, by Richard GerverFinally, last year, I discovered the wonderful @IanWig and benefited greatly from his coaching. He also was kind enough to introduce me to former headteacher, @RichardGerver, author of ‘Change‘, whose (currently reading) book has inspired me to write this final epitaph for 2013.“The pace of change is greater than ever. We all face new challenges every day in our jobs and in our personal lives. Those who can handle change are the most fulfilled. Those who fear change will find it hardest to thrive.”This key quote from Gerver’s book, sums up leadership for me; and what I mean by leadership, doesn’t necessarily mean as a senior leader; I am referring to leadership in your very own classroom.Background:Over the past seven years, I’ve worked in two school leadership teams and on a third leadership team as an experienced middle-leader. This was a secondment as an SSAT Lead Practitioner and was only a peripheral role. As most of my readers will know, I am currently working as Assistant Vice Principal in a rapidly improving inner-city school in North London. I am responsible for improving the quality of teaching and learning; staff development; appraisal and initial teacher training. Since 2008, working in two academies (one as a National-Challenge), I have had a bit-part contribution to the schools’ best-ever GCSE results as part of both senior leadership teams.London Boroughs of Barnet; Haringey: Romford; Lewisham and BrentSo, good results; but working on two, very different types of leadership teams! Can a great/awful leadership team still raise standards? It appears so; and this dichotomy will be saved for another post in the series.What makes an outstanding senior leader?I did, I didn’t and I do work in an outstanding school. In all three schools, I would consider my leadership at least ‘Good’ by Ofsted definition. I know this is subjective and relative to my own experiences, so please do forgive me. There are no hard facts here, other than my own, public #360Review.The last time I discussed working in schools (Ofsted definitions aside), I considered three of the schools I had worked in myself and the recipe required to make a school an outstanding place to work. You can read this overview here. But what I’d like to address now, is taking each of these school leadership teams/schools into more context in order to consider the following question: What makes an outstanding senior leader?What ethos would you instil on your school corridors?What ethos would you instil on your school corridors?Photo Credit: Dean Terry via Compfight ccProbing questions!There are a plethora of questions posed for leadership reflection. These fall into two distinct categories and into six key areas.The categories are Knowledge and Professional Qualities.The key areas are Shaping the future; Leading learning and teaching; Developing self and working with others; Managing the organisation; Securing accountability; Strengthening the community.360 Leadership Analysis:Like any 360 review, there is a rating scale to help an individual explore the quality of leadership and management, as well as questionnaires to investigate staff perceptions, support self-reflection and evaluation and enable a 360 degree review of your own leadership and management. This is mine.Credit: (c) Can Stock Photo Inc. / zaganDesignShaping the Future (Knowledge):The headteacher should know about: local, national and global trends; ways to build, communicate and implement a shared vision; strategic planning processes; strategies for communication both within and beyond the school; new technologies, their use and impact; leading change, creativity and innovation. (Knowledge)Here are the key questions to consider, with my own analysis in the photo that follows.I know about local trendsI know about national trendsI know about global trendsI know about ways to build a shared visionI know about ways to communicate a shared visionI know about ways to implement a shared visionI know about strategic planning processesI know about strategies for communication within the schoolI know about strategies for communication beyond the schoolI know about the use of new technologiesI know about the impact of new technologiesI know about leading changeI know about leading creativityI know about leading innovationMy own evaluation of these questions are below. You can click on the image to enlarge the view.Shaping the Future – click to viewYou can see for yourself, that I clearly need to grasp what “I know about global trends”.Self-comparative analysis:For the benefit of this blogpost and the software used to generate this #360Review, there is a function that allows you to compare your last reflection. The comparison below, shows August 2010, compared with my most recent reflection in December 2013. I will only offer this snapshot once, throughout the entire series.Shaping the Future – click to viewShaping the Future (Professional Qualities):The headteacher should be committed to: a collaborative school vision of excellence and equity that sets high standards for every pupil; the setting and achieving of ambitious, challenging goals and targets; the use of appropriate new technologies; inclusion and the ability and right of all to be the best they can be. The headteacher should be able to: think strategically, build and communicate a coherent vision in a range of compelling ways; inspire, challenge, motivate and empower others to carry the vision forward; model the values and vision of the school. (Professional Qualities)Here are the key questions to consider, with my own analysis in the photo that follows.I am committed to a collaborative school vision of excellence and equity that sets high standards for every pupilI am committed to the setting of ambitious, challenging goals and targetsI am committed to the achieving of ambitious, challenging goals and targetsI am committed to the use of appropriate new technologiesI am committed to inclusionI am committed to the ability and right of all to be the best they can beI am able to think strategicallyI am able to build a coherent vision in a range of compelling waysI am able to communicate a coherent vision in a range of compelling waysI am able to inspire, challenge, motivate and empower others to carry the vision forwardI am able to model the values of the schoolI am able to model the vision of the schoolShaping the Future – click to openKey questions:In terms of how we are judged (by Ofsted) within leadership and management  (and making explicit references to school evaluation forms); here is my final analysis. Leadership and management at any school, includes all teachers with a leadership responsibility. But, in this case, the final analysis, is about my own current performance.The verdict:“I should show that… (with my own summary in red font):The vision for the school is clearly articulated, shared, understood and acted upon effectively by all. I currently see this as the most difficult aspect to achieve. This question recently was posed of me in my own appraisal. I find myself using mantras and philosophies gathered over time; some values blurred by Ofsted and others inspired by headteachers I know or work with. It is now my sole objective to define for 2014.Work within the school community to translate the vision into agreed objectives and operational plans which will promote and sustain school improvement. I am confident this is achieved and sustained.Demonstrate the vision and values in everyday work and practice. I am confident this is achieved and sustained 99% of my working days. Read more here.Motivate and work with others to create a shared culture and positive culture. This is achieved in small pockets of teams within areas of my responsibility. The challenge would be to motivate and share best practice competently and consistently across a school project; and sustain this. I have some examples, but nothing I would consider monumental.Ensure creativity, innovation and the use of appropriate new technologies to achieve excellence. Achieved and sustained.Ensure that strategic planning takes account of the diversity, values and experience of the school and community at large. I am confident this is achieved within areas of my responsibility; some which have impact across the entire school..Further reading:Meanwhile, make sure you have read:Part 1: Shaping the future: What makes an outstanding senior leader? #360Review Part 2: Leading Learning and Teaching: How would you lead teaching and learning? #360Review Part 3: Developing self and others: How to develop yourself and work with others? #360ReviewPart 4: Managing the organisation: Can you manage the school organisation? #360ReviewPart 5: Securing accountability: Securing accountability with leadership actions: #360ReviewPart 6: Strengthening the community; Headship: Can you engage with the internal and external school community? #360Review Other useful reads:51.511214-0.119824Related

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